STAR Technique

Utilize the STAR Technique for Answering Behavioral Questions

When answering behavioral questions (“Tell me about a time when…”) it’s easy to include too much detail, miss the point, forget to include the result or impact of what you did. The STAR technique provides a concise and thorough framework for organizing responses to behavioral interview questions. Practice your responses to behavioral questions using the STAR technique to tell your stories smoothly and precisely directed to the employer’s questions. Describing specific situations and experiences adds credibility to your responses regarding your qualifications for the position.

Situation: Class project, student activity, volunteer experience, job, …

As a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a student organization with members …

Task: Goal, problem to be solved, improvement to be made, …

…I suggested establishing a mentoring program for area junior high school students to increase their interest in math and science and as a way for engineering students to explore careers in teaching.

Action: Planning and implementation done to reach goal, solve a problem, …

I formed a committee to research the idea and then develop procedures, policies, and marketing plans. To recruit participants, we designed a direct-mail postcard to send to all mechanical engineering students. After presenting our proposal to a local middle school science teacher, we were welcomed into the classroom.

Result: The outcome, impact, influence, change resulting from your action …

Ten pairs of students were active in the mentoring program last year. As seniors, two engineering graduates entered the teaching profession and the junior high students started an engineering club after school. We have already started organizing this year’s program with the same teacher.